Strategies

The goal of a well-designed lighting control system is to reduce energy consumption while providing adequate light for the task at hand. Many studies show that individual control strategies save between one-quarter and one-third of lighting energy, while combining multiple controls strategies can drive nearly 40 percent savings.

Lighting Zones

Different areas of a building have different lighting needs. A large open office space might need the lights on all day, but could save energy by turning most of the lights off at night. Lighting in a conference room that is only used intermittently could be turned off until someone enters the room. Areas near windows can take advantage of natural daylight by dimming lights during the day. Each of these lighting zones can be managed with one or more lighting strategies. Well-planned lighting zones and the lighting control strategies used to manage them should be identified based on how much light is needed, where and when.

Switching

Switching lights on and off is the most basic form of lighting control. Unfortunately, lights are often left burning when they are not needed. A simple switch connected to a vacancy detector can be a powerful, inexpensive tool to reduce energy use in areas like closets and conference rooms.

Smart Time Scheduling

A smart scheduling system for lighting controls manages light levels based on time of day and day of the week. A typical open office space or retail business might have all lights on during business hours and rely on switches and vacancy detectors after hours.

Occupancy/Vacancy Detection

Vacancy detectors save energy by turning off lights when areas are vacant. Occupancy sensors add convenience by turning lights on when the device senses human presence. These devices can range from a simple passive infrared detector built into a light switch to a networked detector that controls lighting and also contributes to an integrated building automation strategy – sharing occupancy/vacancy information with other components of a building automation system.

Dimming

Dimming can maximize the energy savings of lighting control strategies by dropping light levels to their most effective level. Fluorescent lighting, while efficient, typically does not respond well to dimming. New LED technology offers enhanced 0-10v dimming that not only saves energy but can improve the comfort of a space by bringing lighting to the level that best suits the use of the room.

Daylight Harvesting

Utilizing dimming technology, or on/off switching, daylight harvesting saves energy by reducing light levels where there is enough ambient light through windows, skylights or other sources. Photo sensors for daylight harvesting can be a data point in an integrated lighting control network or work with a standalone system.

Load Shedding/Demand Response

To cut peak demand and reduce stress on the electric power grid, many utilities offer load shedding or demand response programs in exchange for incentives or lower energy costs. Networked lighting control systems can take advantage of these programs by temporarily reducing light levels in response to a signal from the utility.

High-End Task Tuning

Commercial buildings are typically over-illuminated. Light levels may have been designed for paperwork, while typical office tasks have switched to self-lit compute rscreens. High-End Task tuning saves energy by setting light levels to the correct, safe, comfortable level for the task.

Scene Selection/Personal Control

Pre-set lighting scenes allow the occupants of a space to match lighting levels to changing needs during the workday. Lighting scenes may include turning off lights in the front of a classroom for a film, raising light levels for detailed tasks, dimming lights to create a mood, or turning off half the lights to reduce energy use.

Integration With Building Automation Systems

An open, non-proprietary Lighting Controls network allows Lighting, HVAC and Security systems to share occupancy signals across building control systems and enables off site monitoring, control and optimization for ongoing energy efficiency.

Applications

From the office to the warehouse, Yorkland offers a wide range of lighting controls to meet every need. Choose from an array of wired and wireless solutions, control options, dimmers, occupancy/vacancy sensors and more — all easy to install and easy to use.

Conference Room/Large Office

Devices typically used are :

  • Photo sensor to balance natural and artificial light for optimal light level.
  • Occupancy detector to keep lights off when not needed.
  • A wall interface module for end-user control of dimming/scene selection.
  • Optional integration with BACnet Building Control System.

Individual Offices Without Windows

Devices typically used are wired or wireless switch with ceiling-mounted wireless occupancy sensors.

Storage Closet

Recommend devices to be used include wired wall box occupancy sensor and switch.

Hallway

Recommend devices to be used include wireless or wired switch with ceiling-mounted wireless occupancy sensors.

Stairwell

Recommend devices include occupancy detector to hold all stairwell fixtures at minimum required foot-candles at floor level when vacant and to brighter,user-defined foot candles when occupied.

Kitchen/Cafeteria

Recommend devices include :

  • Photo sensor to balance natural and artificial light for optimal light level.
  • Wall module for control of dimming/scene selection.
  • Zone scheduled to hold lighting on when cafeteria is open and operate on occupancy sensor when cafeteria is closed.
  • Optional integration with BACnet Building Control System

Open Office Area

Recommend devices include :

  • Wall module for end-user control of dimming/scene selection.
  • Zone scheduled to hold lighting on during office hours. Lights can be switched on or operate on occupancy sensor after hours.
  • Lighting circuit along windows tied to photo sensor for daylight harvesting.
  • Optional integration with BACnet Building Control System.

Individual Offices with Windows

Recommend devices include :

  • Integrated photo sensor to balance natural and artificial light for optimal light-level.
  • Occupancy detector to keep lights off when not needed.
  • Wall module for end-user control of dimming/scene selection.
  • Optional integration with BACnet Building Control System.

Parking Garage

Recommend devices include :

  • Photo sensor to balance natural and artificial light for optimal light level.
  • Occupancy detector to keep lights off when not needed in certain areas of the garage
  • Optional integration with BACnet Building Control System.

Contact Yorkland Controls as we can assist you in applying the right products and systems for the applications.